“The biggest challenge facing education today is how to teach everyday communication between people and computers.” – Monika Szalek, Poland

“The biggest challenge facing education today is how to teach everyday communication between people and computers.” – Monika Szalek, Poland

Monika Szalek
Computer Science Teacher
Strumienie Schools of The Sternik Association
Warsaw, Poland

For MIE Expert Monika Szalek, the right tools can make a world of difference – especially when teaching students basic computer skills.

“I think that the biggest challenge facing education today is how to teach everyday communication between people and computers,” Szalek tell us, “so I work with programs like Minecraft to teach young people the philosophy of communication with computers and other controllers, and how to write algorithms and do programming.”

Microsoft Teams and OneNote Class Notebook play a major role in Szalek’s classroom, and her students learn to use these tools very quickly.

“I teach my students how to use Teams to discuss, share, learn and collaborate,” says Szalek. “I prepare my materials and homework for my students on Teams, so I can check their work and communicate with them virtually.” Szalek also practices what she teaches, using the apps on her phone and taking notes on paper far less often.

What’s next on Szalek’s journey?

“So far, I have taught teachers in my school how to use Microsoft’s and other firms’ products in their work,” she says. “But since I have been an MIE, I’ve seen a lot of programs to teach students computer science and programming. I started using these programs, and it was a very nice experience. I want more!”

Connect with Monika through her Microsoft Educator Community Profile.

About Monika Szalek

  • Educational background: Higher education
  • Favorite Microsoft product, tool, technology: Microsoft Teams
  • Website I check every day: https://minecraft.makecode.com
  • Favorite book: Popular science fiction
  • What is the best advice you have ever received? A teacher should help her students to grow.

This post was originally published on this site.