What’s New in EDU – Women’s History Month Special Edition

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This month, as a part of Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day, we’re bringing you a special edition of What’s New in EDU focused on celebrating the women and girls who use their passion for STEM to solve real problems and create amazing things.

To honor their achievement, and encourage other girls to follow in their path, we’ve rounded up a collection of resources aimed at helping educators create an inclusive classroom, where girls aren’t just supported but inspired to pursue STEM careers.

According to a recent study, 31 percent of girls think that coding and computer programming jobs are “not for them.” By high school, that number jumps to 40 percent, and by college, 58 percent of girls are counting themselves out of STEM opportunities altogether.

To buck the trend, we have to show girls what the pathway looks like for women working in STEM. That’s where our resources come in.

Resources to help close the gender gap and inspire girls, along with all students, to love STEM:

 

  • Girls who know a woman in a STEM profession are significantly more likely to confidently engage in STEM activities (61 percent) than those who don’t (44 percent). By enlisting Skype in the Classroom, you can invite role models who exemplify the possibilities to meet and discuss their STEM journeys with your students. Registration is currently open for a free Skype in the Classroom broadcast and live chat with Dr. Jane Goodall on April 2nd and 9th.
  • Get your free STEM action guide. You’ll find easy things that educators, administrators and parents can do to help inspire girls to stay interested in STEM and #MakeWhatsNext.
  • Now through April, participiate in a free DigiGirlz Workshop at a Microsoft Store near you. The 2-hour workshops feature guest speakers, live Q&As, hands-on coding lessons, and other STEM activities. Workshop topics will cover women in gaming, aviation, space, coding and business.
  • Check out STEM activities led by women and Skype courses on gender equality taught by Amy Rosenstein and Tammy Dunbar.
  • You can also find courses on gender equality and UN sustainability goals, empowering girls to pursue STEM, and how to use Microsoft Education community resources to engage STEM skills.

This month’s #MSFTEduChat TweetMeet will also discuss ways we can empower girls to #MakeWhatsNext with STEM. Join us at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, March 19 to chat with fellow educators from around the world on how we can all help close the gender gap, both in STEM classes and careers.

We’ve also created a series of downloadable posters featuring advice and encouragement from women who are paving the way for future generations of STEM-loving women and girls. These are free to download and print so young women can hang them in their rooms, lockers, mirrors or classrooms—anywhere they might need a jolt of positive inspiration.

 

Other New Resources to Help You Encourage STEM Learning This Month

 

Remember to tune in to this year’s Education Exchange (E2) in Paris, France, April 3rd and 4th as we celebrate changemakers in education. Livestreams will be available for both the opening and closing keynote speeches. Already experiencing the difference in your classroom? Share your changemaker story with us!

Flipgrid, the leading video discussion platform for millions of students, educators and families from around the world, will unveil an all-new version at this year’s FlipgridLIVE event, held on June 24th in Philadelphia, PA. Space is limited, so register to join the fun today.

As previously announced at BETT, Microsoft Forms now includes the math keyboard for free-form answers. This allows students to easily enter their answer using the math keyboard, saving time and frustration.

This year, we hope you’ll join us in celebrating Women’s History Month by encouraging young women and girls to pursue their passion for STEM and providing them the tools needed to ensure their success, in the classroom and beyond.

Click here for free STEM resources